Bradford Golf Club
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  • Hole 9 - 491 Yards - Par 5

    After the Fowler revision in 1922 a triangular piece of land adjacent to the course was given by its owner in order to enable a new back tee to be constructed. The gift was probably made in the 1960s. Certainly the change had been made by 1973. The 9th hole goes in a westerly direction and is therefore against the prevailing wind. It has a tee that is placed attractively between a stone wall and a group of trees. The green is visible in the distance perched on a ridge that forms part of Greenhouse Hill. There are trees all the way down the left side of the hole. There is similar line of trees on the right until about halfway (with out of bounds on the practice ground just to the right of these trees). After this point there are just a few trees, and the later part of the hole has none on the right. The out of bounds referred to is something created very recently and is not particularly close in. The trees give the impression of the tee shot being narrower than it is. This first part of the hole is basically flat, though sloping very gently in the player’s favor. The second shot crosses a dip in the ground and needs to negotiate two potential hazards. The first is the line of three bunkers that have now replaced the large bunker (rather ugly when seen in the photos of that time and not in fact put in by Fowler) that used to cut across the fairway. The second potential hazard is Willow Lane which crosses the fairway at about 425 yards. Shortly after Willow Lane the ground rises up to the plateau green. There used to be bunkers set into the rise at the front left and front right of the green, but the one on the right was removed. The recovery from the remaining bunker is difficult, since it is well below the level of the green, so visibility is not good, and the ball has to be got into the air very quickly. The green is always a difficult target from any distance, especially when the flag is at the front. There is very little margin for error then. Also, it is hog-backed in shape and balls easily run through the green in consequence. The ground beyond the left side of the green falls sharply away and to the right of the green there is a little dip in the ground. The 12th green is also fairly close in on the right. The green is difficult to hold in two shots because of its orientation, and even a pitch from in front and below is demanding.

     



    Kind thanks to John Beaumont for allowing use of his course description
    a full account of the article can be seen at the link on the Herbert Fowler page

    Kind thanks to John Beaumont for allowing use of his course description
    a full account of the article can be seen at the link on the Herbert Fowler page

     
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